Are you our next Talking Grief volunteer?

Grief can seem overwhelming, but with time, and caring and supportive volunteers to listen, we hope clients and carers will be gently enabled to talk about their feelings, and explore strategies that may help them to build resilience and adjust to their situations.   

Talking Grief is a new program established to support family carers looking after a loved one with Motor Neurone Disease (MND). This new volunteer driven loss, grief and bereavement program will help families better understand and manage the negative impacts that can be caused by the exceptional level of strain the MND caring role entails.    

Training to ensure volunteers are well equipped to provide effective and sensitive support will be provided including: –

  • empathic listening and non-verbal communication,
  • bereavement support strategies,
  • supporting carers and families, including children,
  • understanding legal and ethical situations that may arise in providing bereavement support,
  • how to identify complicated grief and referral pathways to professional grief counsellors, and importantly,
  • how to care to themselves whilst supporting others.  

Trained ‘Talking Grief’ volunteers will offer weekly support opportunities to clients, carers and their support networks, and will include one-on-one and group chats, face to face as well as by telephone and video call to ensure families living outside of metro Adelaide are able to access this support.

We would like to hear from anyone who may be interested in becoming a Talking Grief volunteer.  Download our Volunteers Wanted flyer or click here to listen to Talking Grief Project Manager Lisa Clarke explain a little more about the program. Please connect with Lisa at talking.grief@mndsa.org.au or call her on 8234 8448 to discuss your interest in becoming a Talking Grief volunteer.

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